UK World Heritage Site now part of one of the world’s biggest sanctuaries for wildlife

News, Uncategorized
“Storm over Gough Island” by Chantal Steyn is licensed under Creative Commons CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

James Glass, Tristan da Cunha Chief Islander, has announced: “Today we’re delighted to announce our Marine Protection Zone, exactly 25 years after we declared Gough Island in the Tristan group a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Today [Friday 13 November 2020], the most remote inhabited islands on Earth become one of the world’s biggest sanctuaries for life above and below the waves thanks to an international partnership that is supporting the local community and protecting nature.

The community of Tristan da Cunha, a small chain of islands over 6,000 miles away in the South Atlantic has declared that almost 700,000km2 of its waters will join the UK’s Blue Belt of marine protection, becoming the largest no-take zone in the Atlantic and the fourth largest on the planet.

The 687,247km2 Marine Protection Zone – almost three times the size of the UK – will safeguard one of the world’s most pristine marine environments and protect the wealth of wildlife that lives there. The Marine Protection Zone around Tristan is the gold standard of marine protection, with no fishing or other extractive activities permitted across the whole area, also known as a ‘no-take zone’. This move makes the Tristan islanders the guardians of the largest no-take zone in the relatively unprotected Atlantic Ocean.

UK Minister for the Environment, Lord Goldsmith, said: “We are hoovering life out of the ocean at an appalling rate, so this new marine protected area is really a huge conservation win and a critically important step in protecting the world’s biodiversity and ecosystems.

“Tristan da Cunha islanders and this coalition of NGOs and Foundations have done an extraordinary thing and deserve real gratitude and praise. It means our fantastic Blue Belt programme has over 4 million square kms of protected ocean around the UK Overseas Territories.”

A recent study by the University of California and the National Geographic Society (see notes) found that banning fishing in 5 per cent or more of the ocean would boost global fish catches by at least 20 per cent in future.

The announcement, made by the Tristan da Cunha Government, helps the UK Government with its ambition to lead the global effort to tackle the nature crisis and secure protection of 30% of the world’s oceans by 2030.The UK has a duty to protect the wildlife found in all of its Territories and will be responsible for long-term monitoring and enforcement of this vast Zone.

Tristan da Cunha has a long history of protecting its unique environment.  This latest success is the result of 20 years of hard work.  It began with the RSPB working with the Government of Tristan da Cunha to lay the conservation ground work and support Tristan’s exemplary management of its sustainable lobster fishery, then the five-year programme of UK Government Blue Belt support, followed by an international coalition of partners who have generously supported the final phase. The RSPB along with National Geographic also partnered with the Blue Nature Alliance, Becht Family Charitable Trust together with Blue Marine Foundation, Wyss Foundation, Kaltroco and Don Quixote II Foundation to enable this large-scale declaration.

Tristan da Cunha is an archipelago located 2,400km from the nearest land. It takes longer to sail to Tristan da Cunha from Cape Town than it took Apollo 11 to reach the Moon.

James Glass continued,“Our life on Tristan da Cunha has always been based around our relationship with the sea, and that continues today. The Tristan community is deeply committed to conservation: on land, we’ve already declared protected status for more than half our territory. But the sea is our vital resource, for our economy and ultimately for our long-term survival. That’s why we’re fully protecting 90% of our waters – and we’re proud that we can play a key role in preserving the health of the oceans.

“The Blue Belt Programme, RSPB and many others have been valuable partners in helping Tristan da Cunha develop its marine protection strategy. Our long-term relationships have been a strong foundation for this project: to help ensure the unique biodiversity of our archipelago, for the future population of the planet.

Beccy Speight, the RSPB’s chief executive, said: This is a story two decades in the making, starting with the RSPB and Government of Tristan da Cunha commencing a conservation partnership, and culminating in the creation of this globally important protected area. The new Tristan MPZ will be the biggest no-take area in the Atlantic; the jewel in the crown of UK marine protection as an area where no extractive activities are permitted.

“Tristan da Cunha is a place like no other. The waters that surround this remote UK Overseas Territory are some of the richest in the world. Tens of millions of seabirds soar above the waves, penguins and seals cram onto the beaches, threatened sharks breed offshore and mysterious whales feed in the deep-water canyons. From today, we can say all of this is protected.

“In 2020 the importance of having nature in our lives has never been clearer. While Tristan da Cunha may be far away in distance it is still close to our hearts and protecting it is still the UK’s responsibility. Closer to home, the crisis facing nature is also huge. So huge that our wellbeing, our economic future, and our very survival depend on the choices we make now about the natural world. We need politicians to emulate the leadership of this small community to help us build the world we all want to live in. We hope today’s fantastic announcement is the first of many more that help revive our world.”

Enric Sala, National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence, said: “It is testament to the vision of the Tristan da Cunha community that one of the world’s smallest communities can make the single biggest contribution to global marine conservation this year. We can all look to Tristan for inspiration as the world commences a decade of work to protect 30% of the global ocean by 2030.

“The UK Government also deserves great credit for completing its 2016 ‘Blue Belt’ commitment to protect at least four million square kilometres of ocean across its Overseas Territories by the end of 2020.” 

The creation of the Marine Protection Zone is only possible thanks to the far-sighted leadership of the Tristan da Cunha Government and the support of an international partnership. The RSPB-led work on the ground with the local community to enable their visionary decision-making, working with the UK Government Blue Belt Programme, National Geographic Pristine Seas and the Great British Oceans coalition. British Antarctic Survey, University of Plymouth and the Natural History Museum also provided key scientific support to the Tristan da Cunha Government.

Additional information:

Tristan da Cunha is a UK Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic, and also the name of the main island in this remote island group. The archipelago lies over 2,700 km from South Africa and 3,700 km from the nearest shores of South America. The island of Saint Helena is the closest land, 2,400 km away to the north. This makes the Tristan archipelago one of the most geographically isolated island groups in the world.

Discovered in the 16th century, the islands of Tristan da Cunha remained uninhabited until 1810 when the first settlement was founded by a group of Americans, the islands were later annexed by the UK following the War of 1812 and have been a UK Overseas Territory since. As well as around 250 islanders, this mountainous island group is home to tens of millions of seabirds, and several unique land birds. It includes the World Heritage Site of Gough and Inaccessible Islands. Gough is arguably one of the most important seabird islands in the world.

Tristan da Cunha is one of very few places in the world which can offer a baseline for an unimpacted temperate marine system and is recognised as one of just 62 global marine provinces, so is essential for building a globally representative network of marine protection. This zone will be the largest no-take zone ever to be established in the Atlantic and is likely never to be surpassed in scale, so represents a high-profile conservation victory.

There are 25 seabird species that breed in this isolated archipelago, four of which are unique to Tristan as well as being globally threatened: Tristan Albatross, Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross, Atlantic Petrel, Spectacled Petrel.  Study: ‘A global network of marine protected areas for food’ published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)

World Heritage UK response to Planning White Paper consultation submitted

News, Planning, Uncategorized

World Heritage UK has now completed its response to ‘Planning for the Future’, the government’s consultation on planning reform in England, and commented on its potential effects on World Heritage Sites. You can read the response in full HERE

Webinar: World Class Planning? World Heritage and the planning reform White Paper

Announcement, Events, News

Exploring the implications for World Heritage Sites of the proposed reforms to the planning system in England, as outlined in the Government’s recently published consultation document ‘Planning for the Future’.

Online event: 10.30 – 12.30 (maximum), Friday 9th October 2020 via Zoom

Chaired by World Heritage UK’s Vice Chair, Prof. Ian Wray, who will introduce the speaker’s presentations and field questions.

Assisting us with their views and providing context we have:

Vincent Goodstadt, Honorary President of the European Council of Spatial Planners

Katie Wray, Assistant Director in Deloitte’s Real Estate team

Lisa Lamb, Head of Planning and Major Infrastructure at the National Trust

Don Gobbett, World Heritage UK Trustee and planning advisor to the World Heritage UK Board.

The online webinar link with be sent to those who register for the event via Eventbrite here. This is a free event for subscribing World Heritage UK Members. Tickets for non-Members are available at £20.

Katie Wray – Katie is an Assistant Director in Deloitte’s Real Estate team. Prior to this she worked for The Co-operative Group managing and advising on their non-trading portfolio across the country.  Katie specialises in heritage and has a strong background in development management and strategy. She has particular experience in strategic advice on the management and development of historic assets and strategic regeneration areas. She also undertakes more focussed heritage work and has completed numerous Heritage Statements for a variety of clients across the country, including on the Hyde Park Estate and UCL. She was the IHBC NW Events Co-ordinator for 8 years; often presents at heritage-planning CPD events particularly on the application of Heritage Partnership Agreements; and has recently become a member of Historic England’s Places Panel.

Lisa Lamb – Lisa is Head of Planning and Major Infrastructure at the National Trust.  She is the professional lead and is responsible for co-ordinating responses to significant external developments including NSIP’s and DCO’s, as well as schemes with pan-regional impacts such as the Ox-Camb Arc.  A significant part of her role is external engagement and advocacy work, joining up with other heritage sector organisations and responding to key consultations. She joined the National Trust in 2016 and has over 20 years experience working as a planner in both development management and planning policy gained in local government environments.  Prior to joining the Trust she worked as Principal Planner at Cambridge City Council and has more rural planning experience gained at a National Park Authority.   Her Masters specialism is in Urban Design and she has a passion for heritage and design.

Vincent Goodstadt – Vincent has worked for a range of public, private and voluntary sector bodies, and Government agencies. He has held senior management roles in local government for all levels of local and strategic planning services. This has included heritage policy, regional archaeological services and the implementation of strategic and national heritage projects. His recent activities have involved providing strategic planning advice in across the UK and Ireland, including Cambridge, London, Oxford, Sheffield, Scotland and the Irish Border region. Vincent is an Honorary President of the European Council of Spatial Planners, an Honorary Professor at the University of Manchester, Vice-President of the Town & Country Planning Association, a Fellow of the Academy of Social Science and a former President of the Royal Town Planning Institute.

Don Gobbett – Don Gobbett is a member of the WH:UK Board, where he advises on planning matters.  He authored WH:UK’s Planning Position Statement, wrote WH:UK’s response to the revision of the National Planning Policy Framework and in 2019 wrote an article in the Journal of the Town and Country Planning Association on the effectiveness of the UK’s planning systems in relation to World Heritage Sites.  Before retirement Don was the Head of Planning at Dorset County Council, where he was responsible for the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site team and chaired the Site’s Steering Group.   As well as his involvement with WH:UK he is a vice-chairman of Bournemouth University’s Research Ethics Committee, a member of Princeton University Schools Committee, and a member of the Bournemouth Branch Committee of Friends International. 

Ian Wray – Ian Wray is Vice Chair of World Heritage UK and a Visiting Professor and Fellow at Liverpool University. He is the author of ‘Great British Plans: Who Made Them and How they Worked’ (2016), and ‘No Little Plans: How Government Built America’s Wealth and Infrastructure’ (2019). He is a former TCPA Trustee and was Chief Planner, Northwest Development Agency, 2000-2010.

Welcome – a new Director at Edinburgh World Heritage Site

News, Uncategorized

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Edinburgh World Heritage has announced the appointment of Christina Sinclair as the new director of Edinburgh World Heritage, replacing Adam Wilkinson.

Born and raised in Aberdeenshire, Christina studied at both the Universities of Edinburgh and Dundee before working in England in a number of heritage and conservation roles for, among others, Historic England, the Design Council and various consultancies. Specific projects she has worked on include the restorations of both Manchester and Rochdale Town Halls. Most recently, Christina has been working for the Scottish Borders Council as lead advisor on heritage.

Professor James Garden, Chair of Edinburgh World Heritage commented: ‘We’re delighted that Christina will be joining us at this crucial time for the charity, and for Edinburgh. Christina brings a wealth of experience in both design and heritage, in both England and Scotland, and has a huge amount to contribute. She is taking over at a challenging time for the city, but she has an excellent team of experts behind her, and the charity is on a very sound footing. We wish her the very best of luck’.

Christina Sinclair added: ‘I’ve always wanted to return to Edinburgh, and joining Edinburgh World Heritage at this time is a great honor. I fell in love with this extraordinary city while studying here, not just with the architecture and heritage, but also with the people, the culture, and the sheer creative energy of the place. I look forward to listening to, and working with the leaders of the city, and well as residents, community groups, and business owners so that together we can continue to build a flourishing and sustainable Edinburgh.’

Christina Sinclair will be in position from September 2nd 2020.

£92 million Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage announced

Announcement, News, Opportunities

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We are pleased to share the news of the announcement that applications are now open for the £92 million Culture Recovery Fund for Heritage, which is aimed at helping heritage organisations to recover from the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The new Fund is part of the wider £1.57 billion Culture Recovery Fund announced by Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden earlier this month, which is the Government’s biggest ever one-off investment in the sector.

The Fund offers grants from £10,000 to £3 million and is open to applications from heritage organisations, private owners of heritage sites, businesses that are a vital part of the heritage ecosystem and others. Visit the fund webpage for more information.

Please share this good news across your channels and encourage your members, contacts and followers to apply by 17 August.

Planning system reform and World Heritage – online discussion event proposed

Announcement, Events, News, Uncategorized

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You can read more about today’s Government announcement of its consultation on proposals for reform of the planning system in England at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/launch-of-planning-for-the-future-consultation-to-reform-the-planning-system

and

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/planning-for-the-future 

World Heritage UK will be hosting an online event before the consultation period ends on 29th October 2020, to discuss any implications for World Heritage Sites. Watch this space for further details including confirmed date and speakers.

World Heritage UK Business Options Appraisal tender opportunity

News

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Invitation to Tender: World Heritage UK Business Options Appraisal

World Heritage UK (WH:UK) is seeking to appoint an experienced consultant to undertake a Business Options Appraisal as part of our NLHF-funded Resilient Heritage “Unlocking the Potential” project.

The Key Objectives:

  • Generation of an Outline Strategy and Business Plan to guide the evolution of WH:UK over the next 3-5 years.
  • A framework for enhancing the organisational capacity and future resilience of WH:UK.
  • Development of briefs or action plans for further project development and fundraising opportunities

The result of this work will be a clear agenda for WH:UK’s development over a 3-5 year period and a sustainable operating base from which to expand our activities.

We appreciate the complexity of developing such a plan in an ever-shifting environment, so our aspiration is to work closely with the appointed consultants to develop something imaginative and strategic yet responsive to changing circumstances (be they financial, organisational, digital, sectoral or viral).

Contract: August 2020 – December 2020

Fee: up to £12,500 (including expenses, excluding VAT)

Submission Deadline: Sunday August 2nd 2020

Full details can be found in the Invitation to Tender document 

For additional information, expressions of interest, and questions please contact the WH:UK Resilience Project Manager: tiva.montalbano@worldheritageuk.org

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£1.57 billion investment to protect Britain’s world-class cultural, arts and heritage institutions

Announcement, News, press release, Uncategorized

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Britain’s globally renowned arts, culture and heritage industries will receive a world-leading £1.57 billion rescue package to help weather the impact of coronavirus, the government announced today.

  • Future of Britain’s museums, galleries, theatres, independent cinemas, heritage sites and music venues will be protected with emergency grants and loans
  • Funding will also be provided to restart construction work at cultural and heritage sites paused as a result of the pandemic

Thousands of organisations across a range of sectors including the performing arts and theatres, heritage, historic palaces, museums, galleries, live music and independent cinema will be able to access emergency grants and loans.

The money, which represents the biggest ever one-off investment in UK culture, will provide a lifeline to vital cultural and heritage organisations across the country hit hard by the pandemic. It will help them stay afloat while their doors are closed. Funding to restart paused projects will also help support employment, including freelancers working in these sectors.

Many of Britain’s cultural and heritage institutions have already received unprecedented financial assistance to see them through the pandemic including loans, business rate holidays and participation in the coronavirus job retention scheme. More than 350,000 people in the recreation and leisure sector have been furloughed since the pandemic began.

This new package will be available across the country and ensure the future of these multi billion-pound industries are secured.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said:

From iconic theatre and musicals, mesmerising exhibitions at our world-class galleries to gigs performed in local basement venues, the UK’s cultural industry is the beating heart of this country.

This money will help safeguard the sector for future generations, ensuring arts groups and venues across the UK can stay afloat and support their staff whilst their doors remain closed and curtains remain down.

Oliver Dowden Culture Secretary said

Our arts and culture are the soul of our nation. They make our country great and are the lynchpin of our world-beating and fast growing creative industries.

I understand the grave challenges the arts face and we must protect and preserve all we can for future generations. Today we are announcing a huge support package of immediate funding to tackle the funding crisis they face. I said we would not let the arts down, and this massive investment shows our level of commitment.

Rishi Sunak, Chancellor of the Exchequer said:

Our world-renowned galleries, museums, heritage sites, music venues and independent cinemas are not only critical to keeping our economy thriving, employing more than 700,000 people, they’re the lifeblood of British culture.

That’s why we’re giving them the vital cash they need to safeguard their survival, helping to protect jobs and ensuring that they can continue to provide the sights and sounds that Britain is famous for.

The package announced today includes funding for national cultural institutions in England and investment in cultural and heritage sites to restart construction work paused as a result of the pandemic. This will be a big step forward to help rebuild our cultural infrastructure. This unprecedented package includes:

  • £1.15 billion support pot for cultural organisations in England delivered through a mix of grants and loans. This will be made up of £270 million of repayable finance and £880 million grants.
  • £100 million of targeted support for the national cultural institutions in England and the English Heritage Trust.
  • £120 million capital investment to restart construction on cultural infrastructure and for heritage construction projects in England which was paused due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • The new funding will also mean an extra £188 million for the devolved administrations in Northern Ireland (£33 million), Scotland (£97 million) and Wales (£59 million).

Decisions on awards will be made working alongside expert independent figures from the sector including the Arts Council England and other specialist bodies such as Historic England, National Lottery Heritage Fund and the British Film Institute.

Repayable finance will be issued on generous terms tailored for cultural institutions to ensure they are affordable. Further details will be set out when the scheme opens for applications in the coming weeks.

Duncan Wilson, Historic England’s Chief Executive, said:

Covid-19 has hit all sectors of our economy hard, including our heritage. The historic places that help define our country are at risk of being lost forever. This emergency funding package from the Government, including £50m for heritage put at risk during the pandemic, will be a lifeline for our sector, kickstarting repair works at our historic sites which matter most to local communities. It also helps the organisations which look after so many of our precious historic sites, and protects livelihoods of skilled craft workers and businesses hit hardest by the pandemic. It will help to secure a sustainable future for the sector and those working in it, often with years of irreplaceable experience.”

Blenheim Palace UNESCO World Heritage Site re-opens to visitors

Blenheim Palace, News

Blenheim Palace's Second State Room

Blenheim Palace is set to open its doors to visitors again from Saturday, 4th July.

Widely regarded as a masterpiece of 18th century Baroque architecture, ‘Britain’s Greatest Palace’ was built as a gift to John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, from Queen Anne and a grateful nation in thanks for his victory at the Battle of Blenheim on 13th August 1704.

The Oxfordshire UNESCO World Heritage Site houses one of the most important and extensive collections in Europe, which includes portraits, furniture, sculpture and tapestries.

To mark its re-opening the Palace is also putting on display a set of four Marlborough family portraits; one of which features the 4th Duke of Marlborough as a child and has never been on show to the public before.

Other new features will see the Library decorated in the style of the 1920s and the coronation robes, chairs and coronets used by the 10th Duke and Duchess for the crowning of King George VI in 1937 will also be on show.

Visitors will also be able to enjoy al fresco dining in a series of outdoor marquee pods in the Italian Garden next to the Orangery restaurant, which will be serving lunch, afternoon tea and dinner.

As part of its re-opening Blenheim Palace has introduced a series of ‘keeping safe’ measures.

Daily visitor numbers are limited and admission is only via online pre-booking. Visitors will be welcomed at a safe distance, all transactions are cashless and staff in key engagement areas will be wearing personal protective equipment and be behind protective screens.

New signage, barriers and announcements form part of the visit, and additional staff are on hand to provide advice and information. Extra temporary outdoor toilets with washing and hand sanitising areas have also been set up.

Visitors can also watch an explanatory video online prior to arriving on site, which clearly explains the new procedures.

For more information please contact Steph Duncan on 07881 356 736 or at SDuncan@blenheimpalace.com or Drew Cunliffe at drew@flamingo-marketing.co.uk .

Note: The Untold Story and the Churchill Exhibition will remain closed, although visitors will have access to the bedroom where Churchill was born.

World Heritage UK Spring Meeting ‘Restoration of World Heritage – repairs and how to fund them’, Blenheim Palace, 29th April 2020. Registration now open.

Blenheim Palace, Conservation, Culture, Events, News, UNESCO, World Heritage Sites, World Heritage UK
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Blenheim Palace aerial photo credit © Blenheim Palace 2020

The first event of World Heritage UK’s events in 2020 will take place on Wednesday 29th April 2020 in The Marlborough Room at the magnificent Blenheim Palace UNESCO World Heritage Site at Woodstock in Oxfordshire.

It will be a one-day meeting with the title ‘Restoration of World Heritage – repairs and how to fund them’. This is an area of work that the Blenheim Palace team have particular expertise in and are willing to share with participants, along with other contributors.

There will be in the region of £7-8 million worth of repairs underway at the time of the meeting, including dredging the lakes designed by Capability Brown, so plenty of opportunities to experience these with expert guidance, both inside the palace and in the extensive grounds.

Tickets priced at just £75 plus booking fee. Please register HERE

The draft programme is available at Blenheim Palace draft programme v5
Watch this space for updates on additional contributors.

Travel and accommodation information is also available at Blenheim Travel and Accommodation

An informal supper at a local hostelry is being planned for those travelling the day before. More details upon registration.

We look forward to seeing you there!

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