Culturally Natural? – report launch announced at #communicatingWH conference

communications, Conference, Conservation, Culture, Events, Nature, News, Planning, UNESCO, World Heritage Sites, World Heritage UK

Sarah France from the National Trust’s World Heritage Site at Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Park and geologist Jonathan Larwood from Natural England have been working on the links between culture and nature in the UK’s World Heritage Sites for some time now. At last, the report of the ‘Culturally Natural or Naturally Cultural?’ workshop held at Fountains Abbey is ready and will be launched at the ‘Communicating World Heritage’ conference on 9th and 10th October at Ironbridge Gorge. The collaboration for the publication includes support from WWF UK, the IUCN National Committee UK and World Heritage UK.

The report contains papers from speakers at the workshop, results of some new research on Nature in the UK’s World Heritage Sites and forewords from UNESCO, IUCN and the Mayor of Ripon.

Early bird discounted tickets for the full 4-day conference are still available until the 31st August, after which the price reverts to the full rate, so book now to take advantage of the early bird rate at www.communicatingworldheritage.wordpress.com where you can also find the conference programme and other essential details.

‘Running the Business of World Heritage’ – WHUK Networking & General Meeting 4th and 5th July 2017

Business, Events, Exhibition, Network meetings, New Lanark networking meeting 2017, News, training, Uncategorized, UNESCO, Workshop, World Heritage Sites

punlm211008001_o1 CropFollowing on from the success of last year’s World Heritage UK Networking Meeting at the Giant’s Causeway WHS, this year we move to Scotland and the unique and successful New Lanark WHS where we plan to share our experiences on ‘running the business of World Heritage’. So, a commercial theme this year and this is appropriate as the operation at New Lanark is an exemplar. There will be opportunities to learn from each other as we hear from world heritage colleagues on their experiences of business plans and strategies, innovative enterprises and products, hospitality and customer satisfaction and the interpretation of the offer that each World Heritage Site provides to sustain it as a viable and sustainable business. The event will also include a World Heritage UK General Meeting to meet the governance requirements of the charity.

The meeting will take place in the Bonnington Linn Conference Room at the New Lanark Mill Hotel on the 4th and 5th July where a limited amount of accommodation has been reserved for delegates. Booking is urgently required to secure any of the following: 5 bedrooms reserved in the New Lanark Mill Hotel (these are Bed and Breakfast) @£89.00 per night based on two sharing or @£65.00 per night for single occupancy.

17 bedrooms in the Wee Row Hostel (bedroom only but breakfast available separately) @£55.00 based on 2 sharing or £40.00 for single occupancy.

Delegates wishing to book this accommodation MUST either phone 01555 667200 or e-mail hotel @newlanark.org and reference ‘Masters allocation’ for their booking to be made at these rates. Bookings cannot be made online. See http://www.newlanarkhotel.co.uk/ or call 01555 667200 for more details.

The Eventbrite webpage for registration to this event is ready for your sign up HERE

The draft programme is in preparation but so far includes:

  • speakers and presentations from the UK’s World Heritage Sites
  • the World Heritage UK General Meeting
  • an evening reception with New Lanark WHS staff and Partnership Board, with a presentation by the New Lanark Chief Executive on access and new development
  • a 3-course networking dinner (optional) @£23.95
  • 5 specialised tours of the WHS – on architecture, power, textiles, social history and the general story of New Lanark

New Tour for 2017 at Blenheim Palace

Arts, Conservation, Events, News, Opportunities, Uncategorized, World Heritage Sites

Discover the real ‘Behind the Scenes’ at Blenheim Palace, in a fascinating limited edition new tour for 2017. ‘Restoration & Conservation’ will be the theme of the guided tours which will begin in the New Year as part of the extended opening season experience offered to visitors at the Oxford World Heritage Site.

The ‘Restoration & Conservation’ tour will be exclusively available from 9 January – 8 February 2017, running twice per day excluding Sundays. The new tours will tie in to the annual deep clean of Blenheim Palace which will now be on full to visitors during this period. The tour will give an in-depth look into what is being done in each of the State Rooms.

The new tours will look at two very important aspects of running a 300 year old Palace, including restoring a piece of art, building or tapestry to its original condition, as well as the preservation and repair of the historical and cultural site and its artefacts. The tour will also examine the theme of renovation, exploring how Blenheim Palace must also modernise and remain as a comfortable family home and appealing to visitors.

From the necessary continuing restoration of the ‘Capability’ Brown Cascades and Bladon dams, work which will total approximately £2m when completed to keeping the Palace safe for its inhabitants and visitors, the tour will look at which projects are undertaken, when and why.

The fascinating tour will also look at the most impactful projects including The Eyes in 1928. Painted for the 2nd wife of the 9th Duke, Gladys Deacon, these have a great visual impact on visitors. Exposure to the elements over 80 years had caused the painting and plaster work to degrade to a point where they were barely visible. 

From clocks to paintings each piece of work often requires specialist and niche attention, with specialists sought from all over the world to complete the painstaking tasks of restoring priceless pieces of history.

The job of cleaning the China collection used to fall to the 10th Duchess and her unfortunate administrator, Archie Illingworth – he used to dread the call, ‘Mr Illingworth, today we are going to clean the China!’  The Duchess would wash the China and it was Archie’s responsibility to dry it.

 One of the recent renovations is the Bouchain Tapestry, the priceless 18th century tapestry depicting one of Britain’s most important military victories is 25ft wide and almost 15 feet high. The giant wall hanging is made of wool and silk and was woven in the Brussels workshop of the Flemish weaver, Judocus de Vos.

Part of a set of 10, the tapestries are the most accurate and detailed contemporary records that exist of the campaign, not least because the 1st Duke, John Churchill, provided accurate battle plans and portraits of the principal characters. After being painstakingly removed from the walls of the Palace’s Second State Room, the tapestry was carefully rolled up before being transported back to the city it was originally created in for renovation. It took a year to completely renovate!

From keeping the rain out, Blenheim Palace has over 7 acres of roof, to protecting ceremonial robes, the Marlborough;s Coronation Robes were beginning to deteriorate in the sunlight, there is must to learn and lots of exciting facts to discover.

What: New Restoration & Conservation Tour at Blenheim Palace

When: From 6 January – 28 February 2017, running twice per day excluding Sundays

Why Visit: Discover the intricate processes of historical restoration and modern conservation whilst maintaining the heritage of the Oxfordshire World Heritage Site.

Price: Palace, Park & Garden ticket required, Adult £24.90, Concession* £19.90, Child £13.90

Website: blenheimpalace.com

World Heritage Education

Education, Publications, UNESCO, World Heritage Sites

World Heritage Education

This is a Call For Papers for contributions to a new, open access, postgraduate/ graduate journal called furnace that is edited by young scholars in the Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage (IIICH) at the University of Birmingham. furnace hopes to be a facilitator for sparking debates and discussions surrounding the expanding and diversifying disciplinary field of cultural heritage.

Article 4 of the World Heritage Convention states that each State Party has ‘the duty of ensuring the identification, protection, conservation, presentation and transmission to future generations of the cultural and natural heritage’ (UNESCO 1972); it is through Outreach and Education that this ‘transmission’ is undertaken.

 Article 27 enshrines the Educational duties of WHSs, as it states that ‘the States Parties to this Convention shall endeavour by all appropriate means, and in particular by educational and information programmes, to strengthen appreciation and respect by their peoples of the cultural and natural heritage’ (UNESCO 1972).

 It is important to remind WHSs and stakeholders, that Education and Outreach is a duty and obligation. This is a timely reminder as many World Heritage Sites are undergoing a period of change through restructuring and the rewriting of their Management Plans.

 World Heritage Education can occur through formal learning programmes at site level, nationally through state parties and globally. World Heritage Education however remains under researched. This is a symptom of heritage education in general which remains under researched in comparison to that of museum education.

 Therefore we are seeking submissions with a focus on either of the following research questions:

  • What is World Heritage Education?
  • How can the concept of Outstanding Universal Value be communicated to young audiences?
  • What is the relationship between heritage education, museum education and World Heritage Education?
  • How can educational visits to World Heritage Sites enhance learning?
  • How are World Heritage Sites learning resources for classroom based learning?
  • What are the challenges in World Heritage Sites developing learning programmes?

The theme of the 4th issue of the IIICH Postgraduate journal furnace is World Heritage Education.

 Full papers are required by Friday June 10th 2016. They should be sent to: furnace@contacts.bham.ac.uk . Decisions will be made quickly by the editorial board. Those accepted will be reviewed and corrected for publication launch on Friday September 30th 2016.

See the webpage for further information on submissions. https://furnacejournal.wordpress.com/

 For further information or any questions, please contact us via the email above or tweet at @furnacejournal