Presentations from WH:UK Technical Workshop, Bath, March 8th 2017

Bath 2017, Events, News, Workshop, World Heritage Sites

Introduction

This meeting was aimed at World Heritage practitioners and took place in Bath Cricket Club, on 8th March 2017, with an evening social meal the night before.  Its focus was on the UK planning systems in respect of World Heritage Sites – seeing if there was a ‘dovetail or disconnect’. The day looked at the different systems, and discussed a very wide range of case studies in terms of impact on World Heritage Sites.  The event also had a couple of workshop sessions to look at issues and solutions – and the intention is that we can use this information to start to develop a position paper for government in respect of World Heritage and the Planning system. This post gives the presentations and other information from the event.

Final programme

The final programme for the event can be found here: Final programme

Presentations

Please remember that the copyright of presentations and content lies with the authors, so please contact them should you wish to use any material contained therein. 

Morning

Overview of the planning system and planning policy:

1 Don Gobbett Planning Overview

2 Hilary Jordan Planning Policy

How decisions on development proposals are made at local level

3 Rebecca McAndrew Blaenavon case study

4 Nick Bishop Lichfields – Cornish mining case study

Looking wider – national policy and working with national bodies

5 Henry Owen-John Heritage Impact Assessment and other stories

6 Jenny Bruce Edinburgh case study

Afternoon

Heading towards solutions:

National case study – National Infrastructure project

7 Sam Rose Navitus Bay case study

Local Case study – SPD development

8 Anna Irwin Pontcysyllte case study

Attendees list

The final participant list is available: Delegate list 8th March 2017

Feedback

Feedback will follow shortly

Acknowledgements

Our thanks to Lichfields, Historic England and Bath and NE Somerset Council as meeting sponsors, and to all speakers and participants for coming along and making it such an enjoyable and stimulating event.

Technical Workshop: Planning for World Heritage Sites – dovetail or disconnect? Bath, 8th March 2017

Bath 2017, Education, Events, News, Planning, training, Uncategorized, UNESCO, Workshop, World Heritage Sites

THE LATEST IN A SERIES OF TECHNICAL WORKSHOPS ON PLANNING, PRODUCED BY WORLD HERITAGE UK:

bath-credit-martin-pettitt

Tickets for this technical workshop are now available  HERE

DRAFT PROGRAMME FOR 8TH MARCH 2017

Planning for World Heritage Sites – dovetail or disconnect?

MORNING SESSION – HOW DO THE UK’s PLANNING SYSTEMS WORK?

10.00 Introduction

10.15 Overview of the planning systems (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland), to include:

  • planning policy and development management
  • who makes decisions about what
  • the underlying philosophy of the planning approach to development

10.30 Planning policy at national and local levels, to include, for each level:

  • why planning policies are important for World Heritage
  • where to find planning policies on World Heritage
  • what policies exist already?
  • can policies be totally prescriptive?
  • who makes policies – the roles of civil servants/local authority officers and ministers/elected local authority members
  • how to influence decision makers

11.00 Questions

11.10 Coffee

11.25 How decisions on development proposals are made, to include:

  • o   Who makes decisions – the roles of local authority officers and members, central government inspectors and        ministers
  • o   How decisions are made
  • o   What planners need to know when making decisions
  • o   How to influence decision makers
  • o   Heritage impact Assessment
  • o   OUV and “significance” – lessons from the Chacewater, Cornwall appeal decision

12.10 Decisions that threaten World Heritage Status, to include:

  • the role of the State Party
  • which Government departments do what
  • who advises the World Heritage Committee?
  • the role of ICOMOS
  • how is the decision for Reactive Monitoring made?
  • what is the process of Reactive Monitoring?

12.40 Questions

1.00     Lunch and group photo

AFTERNOON SESSION – WORKSHOP SESSIONS TO IDENTIFY ISSUES AND IMPROVEMENTS NEEDED

The aim of the afternoon session is to identify what is going well and what needs to be improved and is everyone’s opportunity to have their say. It will be split into two parts, first looking at national issues and then local government issues, and to hear about some specific examples.

1.30     Introduction

1.40     National and international issues

Possible issues to discuss

  • are the overall planning systems fit for purpose in relation to World Heritage?
  • is anyone monitoring the effectiveness of the planning systems?
  • are national policies sufficiently robust?
  • are World Heritage Sites sufficiently valued?
  • how can state reporting and the Reactive monitoring process be improved?

2.40     Local issues

Possible issues to discuss:

  • is anyone monitoring the effectiveness of the planning systems?
  • are local policies sufficiently robust?
  • are World Heritage Sites sufficiently valued?

3.40     Summing up and closing remarks, to include:

  • summary of gaps/suggestions from workshop sessions
  • next steps, including production of a position paper

4.00     Close and depart

World Heritage Fundraising Masterclass

Events, Fundraising, News, Opportunities, training, Workshop, World Heritage Sites
World Heritage UK Workshop “An Introduction to Fundraising Targets and
Techniques”
World Heritage UK was pleased to support a Giving to Heritage workshop run in London
at the end of November. This was specifically targeted for World Heritage Site Co-
ordinators and provided an introductory insight to fundraising and support from the
private and philanthropic sectors, a new approach to many of us who are more used to
seeking funding from public sources such as Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) or EU
programmes.
Giving to Heritage is a joint venture between The Heritage Alliance and the Institute of
Fundraising, made possible through a funding programme with HLF. This is a capacity
building programme designed to increase the fundraising capabilities of those working in
the heritage sector; training can be delivered through specifically targeted workshops
such as this, and through one-to-one consultancy sessions and webinars. The WHS
training workshop was attended by 14 delegates and was delivered by Valentine Morby
who has direct experience of working with WHSs through work he has done previously in
Bath and currently with the Jurassic Coast Trust.
particants learning from Trainer Valentine Morby photo:chrismahon
The session looked at what an organisation needs to have in place before approaching
and private sector donor – a strong vision, robust business plan and fundraising and
communications strategies. The importance of developing and maintaining long-term
relationships with donors was emphasised and to be clear about exactly what you wish
them to fund, and then build your case. This should be capable of being briefly
summarised through its features, advantages and benefits (the FAB approach) or
through the four pillars of vison (what you wish to do), enemy (what is stopping you), hero
(who can deliver) and recipient (who will benefit).
The clear message in approaching donors is to be clear, compelling, concise and
convincing – a message that everyone went away with!
Further information is available from:
www.instituteof-fundraising.org.uk
www.givingtoheritage.org.uk
Lesley Garlick
World Heritage UK Trustee