UK World Heritage Site now part of one of the world’s biggest sanctuaries for wildlife

News, Uncategorized
“Storm over Gough Island” by Chantal Steyn is licensed under Creative Commons CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

James Glass, Tristan da Cunha Chief Islander, has announced: “Today we’re delighted to announce our Marine Protection Zone, exactly 25 years after we declared Gough Island in the Tristan group a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Today [Friday 13 November 2020], the most remote inhabited islands on Earth become one of the world’s biggest sanctuaries for life above and below the waves thanks to an international partnership that is supporting the local community and protecting nature.

The community of Tristan da Cunha, a small chain of islands over 6,000 miles away in the South Atlantic has declared that almost 700,000km2 of its waters will join the UK’s Blue Belt of marine protection, becoming the largest no-take zone in the Atlantic and the fourth largest on the planet.

The 687,247km2 Marine Protection Zone – almost three times the size of the UK – will safeguard one of the world’s most pristine marine environments and protect the wealth of wildlife that lives there. The Marine Protection Zone around Tristan is the gold standard of marine protection, with no fishing or other extractive activities permitted across the whole area, also known as a ‘no-take zone’. This move makes the Tristan islanders the guardians of the largest no-take zone in the relatively unprotected Atlantic Ocean.

UK Minister for the Environment, Lord Goldsmith, said: “We are hoovering life out of the ocean at an appalling rate, so this new marine protected area is really a huge conservation win and a critically important step in protecting the world’s biodiversity and ecosystems.

“Tristan da Cunha islanders and this coalition of NGOs and Foundations have done an extraordinary thing and deserve real gratitude and praise. It means our fantastic Blue Belt programme has over 4 million square kms of protected ocean around the UK Overseas Territories.”

A recent study by the University of California and the National Geographic Society (see notes) found that banning fishing in 5 per cent or more of the ocean would boost global fish catches by at least 20 per cent in future.

The announcement, made by the Tristan da Cunha Government, helps the UK Government with its ambition to lead the global effort to tackle the nature crisis and secure protection of 30% of the world’s oceans by 2030.The UK has a duty to protect the wildlife found in all of its Territories and will be responsible for long-term monitoring and enforcement of this vast Zone.

Tristan da Cunha has a long history of protecting its unique environment.  This latest success is the result of 20 years of hard work.  It began with the RSPB working with the Government of Tristan da Cunha to lay the conservation ground work and support Tristan’s exemplary management of its sustainable lobster fishery, then the five-year programme of UK Government Blue Belt support, followed by an international coalition of partners who have generously supported the final phase. The RSPB along with National Geographic also partnered with the Blue Nature Alliance, Becht Family Charitable Trust together with Blue Marine Foundation, Wyss Foundation, Kaltroco and Don Quixote II Foundation to enable this large-scale declaration.

Tristan da Cunha is an archipelago located 2,400km from the nearest land. It takes longer to sail to Tristan da Cunha from Cape Town than it took Apollo 11 to reach the Moon.

James Glass continued,“Our life on Tristan da Cunha has always been based around our relationship with the sea, and that continues today. The Tristan community is deeply committed to conservation: on land, we’ve already declared protected status for more than half our territory. But the sea is our vital resource, for our economy and ultimately for our long-term survival. That’s why we’re fully protecting 90% of our waters – and we’re proud that we can play a key role in preserving the health of the oceans.

“The Blue Belt Programme, RSPB and many others have been valuable partners in helping Tristan da Cunha develop its marine protection strategy. Our long-term relationships have been a strong foundation for this project: to help ensure the unique biodiversity of our archipelago, for the future population of the planet.

Beccy Speight, the RSPB’s chief executive, said: This is a story two decades in the making, starting with the RSPB and Government of Tristan da Cunha commencing a conservation partnership, and culminating in the creation of this globally important protected area. The new Tristan MPZ will be the biggest no-take area in the Atlantic; the jewel in the crown of UK marine protection as an area where no extractive activities are permitted.

“Tristan da Cunha is a place like no other. The waters that surround this remote UK Overseas Territory are some of the richest in the world. Tens of millions of seabirds soar above the waves, penguins and seals cram onto the beaches, threatened sharks breed offshore and mysterious whales feed in the deep-water canyons. From today, we can say all of this is protected.

“In 2020 the importance of having nature in our lives has never been clearer. While Tristan da Cunha may be far away in distance it is still close to our hearts and protecting it is still the UK’s responsibility. Closer to home, the crisis facing nature is also huge. So huge that our wellbeing, our economic future, and our very survival depend on the choices we make now about the natural world. We need politicians to emulate the leadership of this small community to help us build the world we all want to live in. We hope today’s fantastic announcement is the first of many more that help revive our world.”

Enric Sala, National Geographic Society Explorer-in-Residence, said: “It is testament to the vision of the Tristan da Cunha community that one of the world’s smallest communities can make the single biggest contribution to global marine conservation this year. We can all look to Tristan for inspiration as the world commences a decade of work to protect 30% of the global ocean by 2030.

“The UK Government also deserves great credit for completing its 2016 ‘Blue Belt’ commitment to protect at least four million square kilometres of ocean across its Overseas Territories by the end of 2020.” 

The creation of the Marine Protection Zone is only possible thanks to the far-sighted leadership of the Tristan da Cunha Government and the support of an international partnership. The RSPB-led work on the ground with the local community to enable their visionary decision-making, working with the UK Government Blue Belt Programme, National Geographic Pristine Seas and the Great British Oceans coalition. British Antarctic Survey, University of Plymouth and the Natural History Museum also provided key scientific support to the Tristan da Cunha Government.

Additional information:

Tristan da Cunha is a UK Overseas Territory in the South Atlantic, and also the name of the main island in this remote island group. The archipelago lies over 2,700 km from South Africa and 3,700 km from the nearest shores of South America. The island of Saint Helena is the closest land, 2,400 km away to the north. This makes the Tristan archipelago one of the most geographically isolated island groups in the world.

Discovered in the 16th century, the islands of Tristan da Cunha remained uninhabited until 1810 when the first settlement was founded by a group of Americans, the islands were later annexed by the UK following the War of 1812 and have been a UK Overseas Territory since. As well as around 250 islanders, this mountainous island group is home to tens of millions of seabirds, and several unique land birds. It includes the World Heritage Site of Gough and Inaccessible Islands. Gough is arguably one of the most important seabird islands in the world.

Tristan da Cunha is one of very few places in the world which can offer a baseline for an unimpacted temperate marine system and is recognised as one of just 62 global marine provinces, so is essential for building a globally representative network of marine protection. This zone will be the largest no-take zone ever to be established in the Atlantic and is likely never to be surpassed in scale, so represents a high-profile conservation victory.

There are 25 seabird species that breed in this isolated archipelago, four of which are unique to Tristan as well as being globally threatened: Tristan Albatross, Atlantic Yellow-nosed Albatross, Atlantic Petrel, Spectacled Petrel.  Study: ‘A global network of marine protected areas for food’ published in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)

World Heritage UK response to Planning White Paper consultation submitted

News, Planning, Uncategorized

World Heritage UK has now completed its response to ‘Planning for the Future’, the government’s consultation on planning reform in England, and commented on its potential effects on World Heritage Sites. You can read the response in full HERE

Welcome – a new Director at Edinburgh World Heritage Site

News, Uncategorized

Christina Sinclair smallest

Edinburgh World Heritage has announced the appointment of Christina Sinclair as the new director of Edinburgh World Heritage, replacing Adam Wilkinson.

Born and raised in Aberdeenshire, Christina studied at both the Universities of Edinburgh and Dundee before working in England in a number of heritage and conservation roles for, among others, Historic England, the Design Council and various consultancies. Specific projects she has worked on include the restorations of both Manchester and Rochdale Town Halls. Most recently, Christina has been working for the Scottish Borders Council as lead advisor on heritage.

Professor James Garden, Chair of Edinburgh World Heritage commented: ‘We’re delighted that Christina will be joining us at this crucial time for the charity, and for Edinburgh. Christina brings a wealth of experience in both design and heritage, in both England and Scotland, and has a huge amount to contribute. She is taking over at a challenging time for the city, but she has an excellent team of experts behind her, and the charity is on a very sound footing. We wish her the very best of luck’.

Christina Sinclair added: ‘I’ve always wanted to return to Edinburgh, and joining Edinburgh World Heritage at this time is a great honor. I fell in love with this extraordinary city while studying here, not just with the architecture and heritage, but also with the people, the culture, and the sheer creative energy of the place. I look forward to listening to, and working with the leaders of the city, and well as residents, community groups, and business owners so that together we can continue to build a flourishing and sustainable Edinburgh.’

Christina Sinclair will be in position from September 2nd 2020.

Planning system reform and World Heritage – online discussion event proposed

Announcement, Events, News, Uncategorized

planning-for-the-future-960-x-640

You can read more about today’s Government announcement of its consultation on proposals for reform of the planning system in England at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/launch-of-planning-for-the-future-consultation-to-reform-the-planning-system

and

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/planning-for-the-future 

World Heritage UK will be hosting an online event before the consultation period ends on 29th October 2020, to discuss any implications for World Heritage Sites. Watch this space for further details including confirmed date and speakers.

£1.57 billion investment to protect Britain’s world-class cultural, arts and heritage institutions

Announcement, News, press release, Uncategorized

s300_CultureInv_GOV_UK

Britain’s globally renowned arts, culture and heritage industries will receive a world-leading £1.57 billion rescue package to help weather the impact of coronavirus, the government announced today.

  • Future of Britain’s museums, galleries, theatres, independent cinemas, heritage sites and music venues will be protected with emergency grants and loans
  • Funding will also be provided to restart construction work at cultural and heritage sites paused as a result of the pandemic

Thousands of organisations across a range of sectors including the performing arts and theatres, heritage, historic palaces, museums, galleries, live music and independent cinema will be able to access emergency grants and loans.

The money, which represents the biggest ever one-off investment in UK culture, will provide a lifeline to vital cultural and heritage organisations across the country hit hard by the pandemic. It will help them stay afloat while their doors are closed. Funding to restart paused projects will also help support employment, including freelancers working in these sectors.

Many of Britain’s cultural and heritage institutions have already received unprecedented financial assistance to see them through the pandemic including loans, business rate holidays and participation in the coronavirus job retention scheme. More than 350,000 people in the recreation and leisure sector have been furloughed since the pandemic began.

This new package will be available across the country and ensure the future of these multi billion-pound industries are secured.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson said:

From iconic theatre and musicals, mesmerising exhibitions at our world-class galleries to gigs performed in local basement venues, the UK’s cultural industry is the beating heart of this country.

This money will help safeguard the sector for future generations, ensuring arts groups and venues across the UK can stay afloat and support their staff whilst their doors remain closed and curtains remain down.

Oliver Dowden Culture Secretary said

Our arts and culture are the soul of our nation. They make our country great and are the lynchpin of our world-beating and fast growing creative industries.

I understand the grave challenges the arts face and we must protect and preserve all we can for future generations. Today we are announcing a huge support package of immediate funding to tackle the funding crisis they face. I said we would not let the arts down, and this massive investment shows our level of commitment.

Rishi Sunak, Chancellor of the Exchequer said:

Our world-renowned galleries, museums, heritage sites, music venues and independent cinemas are not only critical to keeping our economy thriving, employing more than 700,000 people, they’re the lifeblood of British culture.

That’s why we’re giving them the vital cash they need to safeguard their survival, helping to protect jobs and ensuring that they can continue to provide the sights and sounds that Britain is famous for.

The package announced today includes funding for national cultural institutions in England and investment in cultural and heritage sites to restart construction work paused as a result of the pandemic. This will be a big step forward to help rebuild our cultural infrastructure. This unprecedented package includes:

  • £1.15 billion support pot for cultural organisations in England delivered through a mix of grants and loans. This will be made up of £270 million of repayable finance and £880 million grants.
  • £100 million of targeted support for the national cultural institutions in England and the English Heritage Trust.
  • £120 million capital investment to restart construction on cultural infrastructure and for heritage construction projects in England which was paused due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • The new funding will also mean an extra £188 million for the devolved administrations in Northern Ireland (£33 million), Scotland (£97 million) and Wales (£59 million).

Decisions on awards will be made working alongside expert independent figures from the sector including the Arts Council England and other specialist bodies such as Historic England, National Lottery Heritage Fund and the British Film Institute.

Repayable finance will be issued on generous terms tailored for cultural institutions to ensure they are affordable. Further details will be set out when the scheme opens for applications in the coming weeks.

Duncan Wilson, Historic England’s Chief Executive, said:

Covid-19 has hit all sectors of our economy hard, including our heritage. The historic places that help define our country are at risk of being lost forever. This emergency funding package from the Government, including £50m for heritage put at risk during the pandemic, will be a lifeline for our sector, kickstarting repair works at our historic sites which matter most to local communities. It also helps the organisations which look after so many of our precious historic sites, and protects livelihoods of skilled craft workers and businesses hit hardest by the pandemic. It will help to secure a sustainable future for the sector and those working in it, often with years of irreplaceable experience.”

UNESCO sites lead the way on sustainable development and create value for communities across the UK

Announcement, News, Uncategorized

Dorset and East Devon Coast

Published today (25 June 2020) by the UK National Commission for UNESCO, new research shows UNESCO projects can help build a greener, more equal and more peaceful world, while also creating financial value.

UK Government Heritage Minister Nigel Huddleston MP said: “From Stonehenge to Jodrell Bank, our UNESCO sites tell the story of our shared history and attract visitors from all over the world. This research is testament to the important role these sites play in their local communities and, once it is safe to do so, we will be encouraging people to visit.”

UNESCO projects in the UK generate an estimated £151 million of financial benefit to local communities each year and help bring them together to protect and conserve some of the most important places across the country.

Set up as a specialised agency of the United Nations in the wake of the Second World War, UNESCO harnesses the power of education, culture, science, communication and information to advance global peace building, sustainable development, intercultural dialogue and the eradication of poverty.

From expansive mountain ranges in the Highlands of Scotland to densely populated urban areas such as Belfast, Bradford and Manchester, UNESCO certified projects include Global Geoparks, World Heritage Sites, Biosphere Reserves and Creative Cities. The projects span 12% of the UK’s land area and comprise of partnerships between 1,300 organisations, charities, and businesses.

These partnerships are made mainly on a local level, between hundreds of groups all working together to support efforts in conservation, research, education, capacity building and tourism. This new research shows that continued investment in UNESCO projects is critical in helping the UK and devolved governments meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The report is the first to examine the cultural, environmental and financial benefits to UK life from these diverse UNESCO projects, and their active contribution to the SDGs. Along with preserving precious landscapes, buildings and archives, UNESCO projects are also leading research on vital issues such as water scarcity, refugee integration, climate change and child literacy.

“This research shows the unique value offered by UNESCO projects in the UK. They embody community and enable us to preserve and enjoy our most special places and culture. They also pioneer solutions to some of the world’s most pressing problems and inspire hope in these unprecedented times. Within this report are a number of case studies that can help inform the UK’s path towards a green recovery from the coronavirus crisis.”

James Bridge, Secretary-General of the UK National Commission for UNESCO

Environment and Community

The research highlights the cultural, environmental and financial value of 76 UNESCO projects in the UK. It reveals a creative network rooted in community, rich in potential, and impacting lives here and around the world.

Examples of UNESCO projects with a positive impact on the environment and communities:

  • The Jurassic Coast Trust in Dorset is an umbrella organisation responsible for a UNESCO World Heritage Site covering 95 miles of beautiful coastline. The Trust believes the Jurassic Coast is best looked after by the people who visit it, use it and love it, and are focused as much on the people and communities as upon the rocks, landscape and fossils. They are working to ensure a financially sustainable coastline that is supported by a network of dedicated schools, community groups, volunteers and businesses.

“We are part of this huge global family of World Heritage Sites that celebrate these outstanding features, natural or cultural; it is a very powerful concept that these values transcend national and political boundaries.”

Anjana Khatwa, Programme Manager, Learning at the Jurassic Coast Trust.

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  • Marble Arch Caves UNESCO Global Geopark is the first cross-border Geopark in the world, and crosses the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. The geopark is dedicated to telling the story of our planet through its unique natural, cultural and geological heritage, and its cross-border nature forms a crucial part of the Geopark’s outreach and engagement programme. The Geopark Science Week brings 500 schoolchildren from both sides of the border together to study their shared geological heritage. Demand for the Science Week is high, but a lack of resources restricts the Geopark from hosting it more often.

“The job and excitement and delight when we present material to young people in a fashion that engages them – you can see that you are igniting that enthusiasm in them for our geological heritage and they want to find out more.”

Martina O’Neil, Marble Arch Caves Geopark Development Officer.  

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  • The Isle of Man UNESCO Biosphere Reserve has launched a badge with the UK’s Girlguiding charity. The initiative seeks to support girls and young women to get closer to nature, learn more about sustainability and tackle issues such as hunger, poverty, gender inequality and climate change.

“The badge encourages young members and leaders in our organisation to think about the world around them – to understand the meaning of ‘community’, get involved and make things better. If we can instil these thoughts and actions in our young people, it will make our Island and beyond a better place.”

Karen Walker, Commissioner of Girlguiding Isle of Man.

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  • The UNESCO trail in Scotland is a digital asset to be launched in partnership with VisitScotland, the UK National Commission for UNESCO and Scotland’s UNESCO designations. The trail connects 13 UNESCO designations and aims to increase the value of tourism to these sites by encouraging visitors to stay longer and spend more locally, improving, in turn, the quality of life of the local communities. The trail was due to be launched in early 2020 but has been delayed until after the coronavirus crisis.

“If we lost UNESCO status, what would make us different from any other community organisation? I feel that it gives me more confidence both to be entrepreneurial and to write a funding application. It’s not just us that thinks we’re special, the UN thinks that it’s special. It shows you that you’ve got the outside support – that something beyond the UK, Europe, globally, has said that “We believe that this organisation has the ability to manage this heritage and we believe that it’s special.”

Dr Laura Hamlet, Geopark Coordinator at the North West Highlands UNESCO Global Geopark

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  • The Dyfi UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in Wales has been struggling to make the desired impact on the region and local communities. There is a commitment to celebrate and support the Welsh language and culture, but a lack of resources limits the necessary collaboration needed. Vital funding is essential to strengthen the network and support sustainable development, in line with Wales’ Well-being of Future Generations Act 2015.

“The visitors and potential visitors are an important audience but actually not really as important as the local community, including business. So, it’s critical for us that we have that sort of groundswell of support.”

Andy Rowland, Coordinator, Dyfi Biopshere Reserve

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“Particularly striking is how all designations place the community at the core of their work. Their commitment to UNESCO’s values and objectives means they share a strong interest in bringing people together to build and nurture meaningful relationships with nature, heritage and each other.”

2020 UNESCO National Value Report

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Economy

UNESCO World Heritage Sites rank among the most visited attractions in 2018 and are significant contributors to the UK economy. The research analysed the impact of being granted official UNESCO status, which has helped the 76 sites and projects surveyed generate an estimated £151 million to the UK economy in just one year.

However, the total figure disguises significant variations, even before the challenges brought by Covid-19. Some sites struggle to secure sufficient funding whether through tourism or other means, due to a low profile and lack of resources, and these problems will have been exacerbated during the lockdown. Investment in these sites is critical to increase cross-disciplinary work and enhance their contribution to the UK economy.

Audrey Azoulay, UNESCO Director-General, said: “At a time when we all look for solutions to build more resilient societies after Covid-19, UNESCO sites offer a wealth of concrete actions to reinvent our relationship with nature, to develop decent jobs and foster social cohesion. This report by the UK National Commission to UNESCO is a blueprint for sustainability, and I believe all Countries can take inspiration from this research.”

World Heritage UK 2020 events programme – dates for the new diary

Blenheim Palace, Events, Lake District, News, scotland, Technology, Uncategorized, World Heritage UK

aerial

As agreed by the World Heritage UK Board of Trustees, the first event of World Heritage UK’s events in 2020 will take place on Wednesday 29th April 2020 in The Marlborough Room at the magnificent Blenheim Palace UNESCO World Heritage Site at Woodstock in Oxfordshire. It will be a one-day workshop with the provisional title ‘Restoration in World Heritage Sites – repairs and how to fund them’. This is an area of work that the Blenheim Palace team have particular expertise in and are willing to share with participants. There will be in the region of £7-8 million worth of repairs underway at the time of the event, including dredging the lakes designed by Capability Brown so plenty of opportunities to experience these with expert guidance. Registration will be required to take part in this workshop and places will be limited, so do act swiftly when tickets become available in the next few weeks.

welcome to the LD

World Heritage UK’s summer workshop will be in the recently inscribed English Lake District UNESCO World Heritage Site on Tuesday 21st and Wednesday 22nd July 2020. The venue here will be the Ambleside Campus of the University of Cumbria, where we will be using the Percival Lecture Theatre to consider ‘Marketing World Heritage’. Further details to follow.

Westminster underwater

Preparations are already underway for World Heritage UK’s Annual Conference and AGM which this year will take place in Scotland with the all-too-important theme of ‘World Heritage and Climate Change’. Provisional dates to pencil in you diary at this stage are Tuesday 29th and Wednesday 30th September 2020, with venues expected to be either Glasgow or Stirling and to include visiting the Antonine Wall component of the Frontiers of the Roman Empire UNESCO World Heritage Site. Further details to follow. (photo credit: www.sustainablebusinesstoolkit.com)

World Heritage UK Chair’s Christmas message

Announcement, News, Uncategorized, World Heritage UK

Bath Abbey 006 (1)

On behalf of all the Board of Trustees at World Heritage UK,  I wish all our members, supporters and your families a very happy and restful Christmas.

2019 has been a busy year, set against a turbulent political back-drop and with the need to urgently address global environmental challenges which are undoubtedly becoming the defining issue of our age. We know through our networks the hard work that goes on every day at all of our 32 UK World Heritage Sites, often undertaken by just a few dedicated people and a pocketful of change. Hard work, creative minds and professional expertise then turn these ingredients into heritage protection and interpretation which is the envy of the world.

Christmas is a time for thankfulness and optimism. Perhaps we can look forward to a little more political stability in 2020?  …and maybe even the prospect of more funding?!  Whatever the New Year will bring, we will face it collectively with enthusiasm, mutual support and the knowledge that what we deliver, in conserving our irreplaceable cultural and natural heritage, is cherished by so many in this generation and those who will succeed us.  They can’t always say thank you for all that you do, but I can.

Happy Christmas!

Tony

Tony Crouch
Chair of Trustees
World Heritage UK

World Heritage UK contributes to European World Heritage Ibiza meeting

European World Heritage, International, News, Uncategorized, World Heritage Sites

Ibiza

World Heritage UK’s President, Chris Blandford, attended the 5th European Meeting of the World Heritage Associations in Ibiza on the 26th and 27th November as an invited speaker. The conference was hosted by the Spanish World Heritage Cities Group who generously sponsored event costs.

The theme of the conference was ‘Sustainable Management of World Heritage Sites’ and papers were presented on economic, social and environmental approaches. Chris Blandford was invited to present a paper on ‘World Heritage: a New Opportunity for Global Tourism’, a version of the UK World Heritage Review summary he gave at this year’s annual conference in Llangollen. It  was followed at the Ibiza meeting by a discussion on how most other European countries faced similar challenges but had not so far had the opportunity or resources to bring the case forward to their governments.

The UK Review’s main report includes a short section comparing the considerable support offered to other country Associations by their governments and the tourism sector, dissimilar to the UK situation. Nevertheless, the European country associations feel that the activities of World Heritage UK demonstrate good practice and are keen to maintain contact through the emerging umbrella group, the “European Group of World Heritage Associations”. A further outcome from this engagement is that World Heritage UK, through its presence at these meetings over the last few years, has been contributing to the evolution of an informal governance structure for this group.

Strengthening of World Heritage UK’s ties, relationships, and networking with the other European country World Heritage associations similar to World Heritage UK, together with the promulgation of the Review conclusions to a wider audience beyond the UK are of significance. The latter is obviously very relevant as the UK leaves the European Union and it reinforces the notion that World Heritage has “no boundaries” and will continue to be a pan-Europe concept.

In addition to increasing World Heritage UK’s international credibility, another outcome of being part of this group is learning how World Heritage works in different parts of Europe so that this can be used to expand the case for better support for World Heritage here. 

Equivalent associations to World Heritage UK meet once a year to share experience and good practice. 80 delegates were represented in Ibiza, from Germany, Spain, France, Portugal, Italy, Slovenia, Switzerland and others. World Heritage UK has been regularly represented at these meetings and other workshops over the last three years and is developing a growing network of contacts across Europe. It is expected that the 2020 meeting will take place in Bordeaux.

Ibiza town is not all clubs and mega-yachts. The host World Heritage Site in Ibiza is a ‘Mixed’ cultural and natural site combining a dramatic and well preserved old town, citadel and defences  (demonstrating visible stages from Roman, Islamic, Medieval and Renaissance periods) and an extensive marine and coastal ecosystem containing the rare seagrass habitat (Posidonia – an endemic species only found in the Mediterranean).

World Heritage UK Annual Conference 2019, hosted by the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal World Heritage Site

Conference Pontcysyllte, Llangollen 2019, News, Publications, Uncategorized, WHS Review, World Heritage UK

WHUK Conference 2019 Copyright Sam Rose lowres-8980

2019 Conference delegates Photo: Sam Rose

Hosted by the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal UNESCO World Heritage Site at the Llangollen Pavilion in spectacular North East Wales, this was the 5th Annual Conference and AGM for World Heritage UK and every bit as good as its predecessors. The programme was framed by a new World Heritage UK publication, a review of the state of UK World Heritage Sites called ‘UK World Heritage: asset for the future‘. The conference developed themes from the report, in particular on finance and governance, on diplomacy and ‘soft power’, and the impacts and benefits of tourism. This attracted an excellent range of speakers from as far abroad as Philadelphia, Hangzhou and Dublin as well as from the home nations of the UK, culminating in an expert panel fielding the questions raised by delegates. You can see some of the presentations via these links:

Allan Forrest Wrexham Council, ‘Pontcysyllte Aqueduct and Canal’

Andrew MacClelland, Liverpool University ‘Heritage and the past in the UK’s diplomatic futures’

Aydin Zorlutuna, Arcadis, ‘Trevor Basin Area Masterplan’

Chris Blandford, World Heritage UK, ‘UK World Heritage Site Review’

Jane Gibson/Jo Shoebridge, Durham Castle and Cathedral World Heritage Site ‘Visitor Centre and local artisans’

Michael MacDonagh, Irish Government, ‘Irish perspectives – the challenges and opportunities for heritage’

Peter Moore, National Trust, ‘Looking to a Sustainable Future at Giant’s Causeway for Visitors and the National Trust’

Rebecca Burrows, Purcell, ‘Conserving 20th Century Buildings – an international approach to sustaining significance’

Xinyun Liang, Grand Canal Preservation Centre of Hangzou, ‘China Grand Canal’

Zabeth Teelucksingh, Global Philadelphia Association, ‘The World Heritage City Project – a Public-Private Partnership Model in Philadelphia’

Thanks to the many local partners who contributed to the event, participants experienced some memorable natural and cultural wonders provided by this World Heritage Site, including riding the aqueduct by narrowboat, viewing it illuminated by night, travelling the canal by horse-drawn boat, by routemaster bus to dine with a Welsh Male voice choir and visiting the steam railway at Llangollen. Follow this link to see the photographs of the whole event taken by Sam Rose.

Over a hundred participants in this event networked vigorously throughout the two days and the conference hall was fringed with pull-up banners and displays to assist in information exchange.

Among the many thanks, World Heritage UK is particularly grateful to Cadw and Welsh Government, Transport for Wales, Denbighshire and Wrexham Councils, Arcadis and Purcell consultancies for their support.