More speakers for ‘Communicating World Heritage’ conference announced

communications, Conference, Conference Ironbridge 2017, Conservation, Education, Events, lecture, News, Opportunities, training, UNESCO, World Heritage Sites, World Heritage UK
JLWong Version 4

             Judy Ling Wong              CBE OBE FRSA

paul_simons

Paul Simons

Two more interesting speakers join the line-up at the ‘Communicating World Heritage Conference’ 7-10th October at the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site. You can hear the UK President of the Black Environment Network, Judy Ling Wong, talk about engaging ethnic minorities in World Heritage. Judy is a major voice on policy towards social inclusion. Joining her is the Secretary General of the Great Spas of Europe UNESCO project, Paul Simons, presenting the value of transnational cooperation in World Heritage. The ‘Great Spas of Europe’ is a serial transnational nomination on the tentative list of seven State Parties representing eleven of the most important spa towns in Europe, including Bath.

You can get further information, on registration for the conference and much more, at:  https://communicatingworldheritage.wordpress.com/

Gorham’s Cave Complex WHS – lecture

Education, Events, Gorham's Cave Complex, lecture, UK Overseas Territories, Uncategorized

ICOMOS-UK would like to invite you to join them for their annual Christmas lecture, which will celebrate the inscription of the UK’s latest World Heritage Site, the Gorham Cave Complex in Gibraltar, earlier this year. They will be welcoming Professor Clive Finlayson, Director of the Gibraltar Museum and of the Gorham’s Cave Complex, to give a lecture entitled ‘In the footsteps of the Ancestors – excursions into the Gorham’s Cave complex World Heritage Site’.

Event Details                                                                                                                                              Date: 15 December 2016

 Venue: the Gallery, 70 Cowcross St, London, EC1M 6EJ

 Tickets: £16 (members)/ £19 (non-members) / £11 (students)

The ticket price includes a glass of wine and festive refreshments

The dispersal of modern humans across the globe in the Late Pleistocene is an unfolding story. As people reached new regions of the planet they discovered that they had not been alone. Conventional wisdom tells us that the competitively superior modern humans were responsible for the demise of all who they came across in their relentless path towards global colonisation. The story of humanity is much more complex than this and it is becoming increasingly clear that the evidence does not support this simple model. New technologies, now capable of piecing together the entire Neanderthal genome, are revolutionising the way in which we understand the story.

New technologies are not enough on their own – they often rely on fossils and artefacts which largely come from museum collections from caves excavated over a century ago. Fortunately, there are also sites which have survived the attention of over-eager Victorian archaeologists and their contemporaries and which have the potential, in combination with new technologies, of revealing the secrets of the Ancestors. These sites, which include the Gorham’s Cave complex, newly inscribed as a World Heritage Site, constitute the most universal heritage of all, that of all humans, past, present and future. It is our responsibility to protect these key sites and to welcome them, as equal partners, into the community of castles, churches and historic towns.

Book now: Visit http://www.icomos-uk.org/about-us/events/ to download a booking form and return it to us at ICOMOS-UK, 70 Cowcross St, London, EC1M 6EJ or email it to admin@icomos-uk.org

Payments can be made by cheque addressed to ICOMOS-UK or online at http://www.icomos-uk.org/payment/

Durham conference: ‘Evidence On Trial’

Conference, Education, lecture, News, Opportunities, Uncategorized, UNESCO

Durham Castle- credit ADTeasdaleEvidence On Trial: weighing the value of evidence in academic enquiry, policy and everyday life

An international conference hosted by the Institute of Advanced Study, Durham University, 12 – 14 July 2016. As well as panel sessions to explore a variety of evidential issues, the conference will host a major debate: Evidence On Trial. This will address the question ‘is there such a thing as reliable evidence?’

Of particular interest to World Heritage UK members will be: ‘Evidence under the Heritage Bridge’, by Dr Andreas Pantazatos (Durham University). This panel will explore how we can best address what kind of evidence is required to inform those who manage World Heritage sites so as to meet our obligations to protect the past for future generations and realise a shared sense of belonging for all relevant stakeholders. The 1972 UNESCO Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage defines these obligations, establishing a mandate to foster global solidarity through wise stewardship of these unique sites.

Booking details can be found at https://www.dur.ac.uk/conference.booking/details/?id=481

Durham Cathedral WHS 30 years Lecture on Ironbridge Gorge

30th Anniversary, Celebration, Education, Events, lecture, News, UNESCO, World Heritage Sites

May lecture poster

MAY LECTURE

Monday 9th May, 6pm

Room PG20, Pemberton Building, Palace Green Library, Durham

Anna Brennand
Chief Executive, Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust

“Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site: the Challenges of the Last 30 Years and the Opportunities for the Future”

Anna will discuss the challenges faced by the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site and explain the opportunities these present for protecting its outstanding universal value, as the Site celebrates its 30 years designation.

 Anna Brennand has been Chief Executive of the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust since June 2013. Before taking up this post Anna was the Trust’s Deputy CEO and Director of Finance & Resources having joined the Museum in 2007. During this time Anna led the successful, multi-award winning £12m redevelopment of Blists Hill Victorian Town, the Trust’s largest site. Anna is a Board Member of the Museums Association, a member of the National Museum Directors Council and sits on a variety of regional tourism bodies. She is also a Trustee of a large Further Education college and a Trustee of World Heritage UK. She lectures at the Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage on the topics of Managing Multi-site Museums, Fundraising in the Heritage Sector and Income Generation in Heritage Organisations.


 The lecture will be followed by a drinks reception at the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre.

 The lecture is free of charge. However, as places are limited, booking is necessary.

Please reserve your place by writing to the organiser at raffaella.aliprandi@durham.ac.uk.

 Alternatively, you can register your interest by contacting the World Heritage Site Visitor Centre using the contact details below.

If possible please would you let me know if you intend to attend the drinks reception too, for catering purposes.

I am looking forward to seeing you at the lecture.

 Kind regards,

 Raffaella Aliprandi

WHSVC Lecture Series Organiser
Durham World Heritage Site Visitor Centre
7 Owengate
DH1 3HB
Durham

Email: raffaella.aliprandi@durham.ac.uk
Tel: 0191 334 3805

The World Heritage Convention: A UK Perspective, free event

Events, lecture, News, Opportunities, UNESCO, World Heritage Sites

The World Heritage Convention: A UK Perspective

Henry Owen-John, Historic England

28 April, 17:30 – 18:30

University of Birmingham, Room TBC

Free event, all welcome

Book your free place: www.worldheritagetalk.eventbrite.co.uk

Henry Owen John, Head of International Advice for Historic England will look back to the origins of UNESCO and the introduction of cultural conventions, particularly the 1972 World Heritage Convention. Since 1972 definitions of heritage have expanded to become much broader and inclusive, yet World Heritage Sites, by their very nature are places that are unique or exceptional in global terms. This divergence poses a number of challenges. The criteria for achieving Outstanding Universal Value, the concept that is at the core of the Convention, have been set by experts and nominations for WHS status are led by specialists so how best can inclusive approaches to world heritage, in which often diverse communities can participate, be developed? And of what relevance is world heritage to the wider communities beyond the 29 WHSs in the UK and its overseas territories?

The World Heritage List is dominated by relatively prosperous countries with longstanding systems for the identification and protection of cultural and natural heritage. How can a more balanced and credible List be developed when so many countries have an understandably limited capacity to develop successful nominations? And, with 192 countries, often with very different approaches to heritage management, that are party to the Convention, the UK can sometimes find itself at odds with the broad consensus view about how best to manage and protect WHSs. In particular the concept of “constructive conservation” can clash with less flexible approaches to protection.

In all these circumstances how best can the UK seek to ensure that world heritage and the ethos of UNESCO are, and are seen to be, forces that can deliver social and economic as well as environmental benefit?